NatRoad say zero fatalities still a chance

Four steps to zero road deaths oulined by industry advocates

The NatRoad organisation has reaffirmed its vision of there being zero road deaths in Australia by 2050 with the outlining of four strategies that could assist the nation reach that goal.

Naturally, zero road fatalities would include not losing any truck drivers on the job too.

Outlining their vision for road safety to the middle of the century at a transport and logistics conference in Canberra, NatRoad once again supported calls for the Australian Transportation Safety Bureau (ATSB) to be given the responsibility of investigating heavy vehicle crashes.

Those calls support the Australian Trucking Associations views on that matter.

NatRoad also wants a shift to a risk-based regulatory system with the new Heavy Vehicle National Law (HVNL) being focused on the management of risk.

The third strategy includes taking steps, including introducing stamp duty concessions, to help get old trucks off the roads and new, safer and more environmentally friendly trucks on the job.

And lastly, NatRoad wants to see greater infrastructure investment.

“This should focus on fixing high-risk roads.” says Richard Calver, NatRoad’s Adviser, Compliance.

“Expanding infrastructure investment programs to improve road access for high productivity and oversize/overmass vehicles to reduce truck movements should also be a priority.”

And exactly why does NatRoad want the ATSB to investigate road crashes? Richard says a dedicated authority like the ATSB would have the ability to involve all industry participants.

“That role should also encompass better research on trends and causal factors. Currently, both data and research are inadequate to formulate benchmarks.”

“Let’s bring on the HVNL review and make the law more focused on safety and less concerned with revenue raising.”

What are your thoughts? Do these sound like positive steps? Should the ATSB be involved in road transport crash investigations? Should the government be doing more to encourage operators to buy new trucks?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

Stay up to date with the latest Truck Industry News at heavyvehicles.com.au.



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